Monday, February 10, 2020

New Edition of Learning in Information-Rich Environments: I-LEARN and the Construction of Knowledge from Information

I am delighted to announce the publication of the second edition of Learning in Information-Rich Environments: I-LEARN and the Construction of Knowledge from Information. I met the first edition's author, Dr. Delia Neuman, nine years ago and used her model as the foundation for my dissertation research. Never did I expect I would end up writing the second edition of the book with her and a terrific research team!

The second edition is updated throughout and a new chapter includes real-world examples of the model in action from kindergarten through graduate-level. This flyer provides more information about the updates in the new edition.

Monday, January 06, 2020

New Edition of Management Basics for Information Professionals

Happy New Year!

Today ALA Neal-Schuman published the fourth edition of Management Basics for Information Professionals which I co-authored with G. Edward Evans. It was quite an honor working with him again. I read more than one of his texts in library school, and I co-authored the second edition of Academic Librarianship with him in 2018. You can read more about the new edition of Management Basics for Information Professionals in this press release.

I'm hoping to soon announce another title I co-authored that relates to my dissertation research. Stay tuned and thanks for reading!

Monday, January 07, 2019

Happy New Year!

I hope all is well with you, and thanks for reading!

In the last year, I've continued to work in instructional design and created some of the online tutorials on this site using Articulate 360 tools. I've been doing embedded librarian work with Canvas and Zoom as well as teaching in-person sessions in Honors and ICT. I've been participating in the Penn State/EDUCUASE Instructional Designer to Instructional Designer program; in fact, one of my projects is the infographic in this post. 

With co-authors, I'm finishing up two book projects that I'll announce when  published (the fourth edition of a management text and the revised edition of the book introducing the I-LEARN model).

Finally, while I no longer work directly in learning spaces (the original focus of this blog), I am contemplating a writing project involved in that world. Contact me if you're interested in learning more.

Monday, January 29, 2018

New Edition of Academic Librarianship

Happy New Year! I've got big news to share in my first blog post of the year. Today ALA Neal-Schuman published the second edition of Academic Librarianship which I co-authored with G. Edward Evans. It was quite an honor working with him! I read more than one of his texts in library school, and I used the first edition of Academic Librarianship in a course I taught. You can read more about the new edition in this press release.

We're currently at work on the fourth edition of Management Basics for Information Professionals. I'm also hoping that I can soon announce a book I'm co-authoring that relates to my dissertation research. Stay tuned and thanks for reading!

Sunday, January 01, 2017

Happy New Year!

While I don't often post here anymore, I wanted to take this opportunity to wish you a happy new year and update you on my current projects.

I've moved on from learning spaces which was the original focus of this blog. Some posts still remain quite popular (and somewhat timely) though they are nearly ten years old:
Since then, I have focused my research interests on instructional design. Specifically I've been working with the I-LEARN model and published a new paper last summer based on my dissertation work.

I'm excited to report that I'm now starting a new position with my current employer. I'll be part of the information literacy and assessment team, teaching instruction sessions, providing instructional design support, supporting student success initiatives, and working on research projects, including co-authoring the forthcoming second edition of Academic Librarianship. I'm also teaching another Academic Libraries course in the spring semester. I expect it will be a busy year.

I wish all of you a happy new year, and thank you for reading!


Thursday, September 29, 2016

Information Literacy Journal Club

Today I had the opportunity to participate in an online discussion group, the Information Literacy Journal Club. This is a group that anyone may join, whether students, information professionals, or anyone with an interest in information literacy. While the group seems largely focused in the U.K., participants from several countries were present. In today's discussion, we talked about the I-LEARN model, specifically focusing on an article of mine published in the Journal of Information Literacy back in June.

The Information Literacy Journal Club is an engaged audience with lots of interesting past discussions, and I encourage you to check out what they have planned for the future!

Sunday, March 29, 2015

I-LEARN: Recent and Upcoming Presentations

In my previous post, I shared a bit about my dissertation and my continuing work related to designing instructional materials with I-LEARN as the underlying framework.  I've given several presentations on the topic and will be presenting others later this year:

  • 2015, August.  Creating Effective Instructional Materials with I-LEARN. Poster to be presented at the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions World Library and Information Conference, Cape Town, South Africa.
  • 2015, June.  Creating Effective Instructional Materials with I-LEARN. Poster to be presented at the American Library Association Annual Conference, San Francisco, CA.
  • 2014, November.  Using the I-LEARN Model to Design Information Literacy Instruction: Results of an Experimental Research Study and Opportunities for Future Practical Applications. Presented at the Association for Educational Communication and Technology, Jacksonville, FL.
  • 2014, October.  Using the I-LEARN Model to Design Information Literacy Instruction.  Presented at the European Conference on Information Literacy, Dubrovnik, Croatia.
  • 2014, August.  Using the I-LEARN Model to Design Information Literacy Instruction: Results of an Experimental Research Study and Opportunities for Future Practical Applications. Poster presented at the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions World Library and Information Conference, Lyon, France.
  • 2014, June.  Creating Information Literacy Instructional Materials Using the I-LEARN Model: Embracing our Instructional Designer Role.  Poster presented at the Special Libraries Association Annual Conference, Vancouver, Canada.

While it's not directly related to I-LEARN, I am excited to be co-presenting an invited master class session with Leslie J. Reynolds at the SLA Annual Conference in Boston:  Revolutionary Learning Organizations: Core Values & Best Practices.  More on that later.

Sunday, March 08, 2015

What is I-LEARN?

In my previous post, I describe how I started down the path of exploring I-LEARN for designing information literacy instruction.  After my copy arrived, I read the book so many times and made so many notations it looked like Franny's little book.  I knew I had found where to focus my efforts, and that's what I've done for the last three years.

So what is I-LEARN?  My higher education friends may be surprised to know that it's a learning model which was initially focused on the K-12 environment. (Here's a way to plan a lesson about Australia.  It has since been implemented in my work as well as other universities like this one.) Without straying too far from the purpose of this post, I'd like to emphasize how much librarians in higher education and school media specialists have in common.  We are experts in finding, evaluating, and using information.  We are generally a very dedicated bunch who want very much for our students to learn and succeed, yet we often have little time to work with students directly.  The faculty member/teacher has to decide that information literacy instruction is important enough to set aside time for it and to continue to emphasize its importance beyond the often single library visit.  I like to point out that the main difference between a high school senior and a college freshman is about three months (and it was pretty cool being quoted on that at ECIL 2014).  Anyway, we have much in common, and school media specialists often have an advantage in that many of them have formal coursework related to instructional design, learning theory, educational technology, and so forth, while many of us academic librarians are still muddling around on our own trying to figure things out.  We really should work together and learn from each other more often.  If you are interested in learning more about our similarities and the prominent role school media specialists have played in instructional design and the development of information literacy standards, take a look at chapter two of my dissertation.

Anyway, so from the start, I really liked that I-LEARN was created by someone who has been working with school media specialists for years and is highly regarded in both the instructional design and the library and information science communities.  It's that combination of theory and practice that serves as the foundation for I-LEARN.  The mnemonic is simply Identify, Locate, Evaluate, Apply, Reflect, and kNow.  Typical library instruction focuses on identify, locate, and evaluate.  We're pretty good at those things.  The model digs deeper into those areas and emphasizes the recursiveness of those steps (we all know how research is so much trial and error, but often our students don't).  What sets I-LEARN apart is the combination of these skills with the latter parts of the model which focus on using information--actually thinking about what you've found, synthesizing it into an information product, revising it, rethinking it, maybe going back for more information, and ultimately adding to your own knowledge base through this experience.  You've learned something!

If you read the book, you'll find much more detail on each stage of the model.  Perhaps like me, you will quickly realize that the model would work very well for information literacy instruction; after all, the core focus of the model is learning with information.  You may also realize too that it would work great for building entire lessons or planning an entire course. I've actually built some assignment guides for a library science graduate course using the model, and it helps in breaking down the pieces of say, writing a literature review.  While my next post will focus on information literacy instruction, Dr. Neuman does emphasize that it's more than a library skills model, it's a learning model which could really be used in any environment.  Pretty exciting, huh!

Next post:  I-LEARN: Research and Practice